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Dental, Oral and Craniofacial
Data Resource Center


Oral Health, U.S. 2002 Annual Report
Section 3: PERIODONTAL DISEASES
3.2 Percentage of adults with destructive periodontal disease

There is no universally agreed upon definition of periodontitis or of disease severity. In this report we will use the Healthy People 2010 definition of destructive periodontal disease (DP) as the presence of one or more sites with 4 mm or greater loss of tooth attachment compared to surrounding periodontal tissues (US DHHS, 2000). Twenty-six percent of the U.S. population aged 20 years and older had destructive periodontitis. In contrast, 5.6% of the U.S. population aged 20 years and older had severe destructive periodontitis, as measured by a mean loss of attachment of at least 5 mm (NHANES III, unpublished data).

Good oral hygiene, such as daily tooth brushing and flossing and periodic cleaning by a dentist or hygienist, can reduce the amount of bacterial plaque on tooth and gingival surfaces and help maintain periodontal health.

SOURCE OF DATA
The analyses reported here are based on the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III) 1988�1994, National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.


Periodontal diseases (as measured by loss of attachment of at least 4 mm at one or more sites)
  • Differences by age (Figure 3.2.1)
    • The percentage of persons with DP was higher among older age groups.
  • Differences by race/ethnicity (Figure 3.2.1)
    • A greater percentage of non-Hispanic blacks compared to non-Hispanic whites and Mexican Americans had DP.
  • Differences by federal poverty level (Figure 3.2.2)
    • The percentage of persons with DP was greater among persons living below the federal poverty level compared to persons living at or above the federal poverty level.
  • Differences by education (Figure 3.2.2)
    • The percentage of persons with DP was lower at higher levels of education.
  • Differences by smoking status (Figure 3.2.2)
    • A higher percentage of persons who smoked at least 100 cigarettes during their lifetime had DP compared to those who have not.

Bullets reference data that can be found in Table 3.2.1.

REFERENCES
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Healthy People 2010. Conference ed. With Understanding and Improving Health and Objectives for Improving Health. 2 vols. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office, 2000.

Figure 3.2.1. Prevalence of loss of attachment of 4 mm or more among adults aged 20 and older by age and race/ethnicity*

Bar graph representing Prevalence of loss of attachment of 4 mm or more among adults aged 20 and older by age and race/ethnicity. Description of graph in following D link[D]

* Age standardized to the year 2000 U.S. population (race/ethnicity only).

Data source: The Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III) 1988�1994, National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Figure 3.2.2. Prevalence of loss of attachment of 4 mm or more among adults aged 20 and older by selected characteristics*

Bar graph representing Prevalence of loss of attachment of 4 mm or more among adults aged 20 and older by selected characteristics. Description of graph in following D link[D]

* Age standardized to the year 2000 U.S. population.

Data source: The Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III) 1988�1994, National Center for Health Statistics, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.


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